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Data Analysis and its Interpretation for use in Remaining Life Assessment
NSIRC student in the lab with equipment - landscape header image

Data Analysis and its Interpretation for use in Remaining Life Assessment

Francisco-Arteche-square.png
Name:
Francisco Arteche
University:
Brunel University London
Research Title:
Data Analysis and its Interpretation for use in Remaining Life Assessment
Abstract:

Underground pipelines are commonly used to transport hazardous liquids and gases. Comparing to competing modes such us road and rail, they are often seen as the most economical, safe and reliable mode of transporting fluids. Companies who are responsible for operating pipelines aim to ensure that pipelines are working under safe conditions within an acceptable risk of failure.

 

Nevertheless, companies often struggle to use integrity/reliability data in a meaningful way in order to determine the predicted remaining life of their underground pipelines: sometimes because inspections are not carried out or are deferred so up to data is not always available, other times because expertise to analyse this data in order to take decisions based may not be available.

 

External corrosion is one of the most typical damage mechanisms present in pipelines. The environment plays an important role in the corrosion process. Parameters such as soil resistivity, moisture content and the pH need to be considered in order to predict corrosion in buried lines.

 

The aim of this PhD is to develop innovative approaches for data analyses and its interpretation to improve and support decision making in integrity management of assets, more specifically external corrosion of pipelines.

Publications:

 

 

  • Anes-Arteche, F. (2016) ‘Challenges in the application of DCVG survey to predict corrosion in pipelines’, Materials and Corrosion.